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54th EASD Annual Meeting – Profil’s contributions to the scientific sessions

Berlin, Germany, 1-5 October 2018

Last week our team joined an exciting and busy 54th EASD Annual Meeting in Berlin. We would like to give you a brief overview about those orals and posters presenting results from clinical trials Profil had been involved in.

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Topics: The Science behind Diabetes, Treating Diabetes, Diabetes Technology

Posted by Dr. Sabine Arnolds on Oct 10, 2018 4:15:43 PM
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Profil explores opportunities for artificial pancreas in type 2 diabetes

Highlighting the role of open and trans-sectoral collaboration in the advancement of artificial pancreas solutions

Profil has recently published a peer-reviewed article on the topic of “Artificial Pancreas Systems for People With Type 2 Diabetes: Conception and Design of the European CLOSE Project ” in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. Profil is the organisation coordinating CLOSE. The article is authored by CLOSE industry and academic partners, representatives of the EIT Health public-private partnership management boards, and key opinion leaders in the field.

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Topics: The Science behind Diabetes, Treating Diabetes, Diabetes Technology

Posted by Prof. Dr. Freimut Schliess on Oct 2, 2018 5:18:00 PM
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Work stress is the new smoking

According to the WHO, about 31% of all deaths worldwide (17.7 million deaths per year) [1] are attributable to cardiovascular disease (CVD), making CVDs the number 1 cause of death globally. Known risk factors for the development of CVD, among others, are smoking, high blood pressure or the lack of physical activity. Especially the latter has been discussed in the recent years and it became known that long hours of sitting [2] may increase your risk of CVD and diabetes (and may apparently even increase mortality, in the case of binge watching [3]). While numerous risk factors for CVD are known and several recommendations and guidelines on how to handle them exist, the prognostic role of what may possibly be one of the most common and important factors on cardiovascular health nowadays has not yet been formally assessed: stress at work.

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Topics: Clinical Trials in Diabetes, Treating Diabetes

Posted by Dr. Theresa Herbrand on Sep 25, 2018 5:12:00 PM
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Do-It-Yourself Artificial Pancreas systems (DIY APS)

The way forward to closed-loop metabolic control in diabetes care?

The challenge

Diabetes represents a huge and multidimensional challenge. Despite the availability of numerous treatment options, many patents still fail to reach their treatment goals. Administration of  the right amount of insulin at the right time still poses a great challenge for the self-management of many people with diabetes.

Accordingly there is a huge need to implement new innovative products and services improving both the effectiveness of diabetes care and the quality of life for people with diabetes. Particularly user-centered products and sercvices co-created with stakeholders including people with diabetes may have a high potential to increase treatment adherence thereby reducing the enormous pressure on healthcare systems.

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Topics: The Science behind Diabetes, Treating Diabetes, Diabetes Technology

Posted by Prof. Dr. Freimut Schliess on Sep 5, 2018 5:16:00 PM
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Targeting the incretin/glucagon system: a glimmer of hope

Dual- and multi-receptor agonists may be a novel drug class to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus with high efficacy

The rising prevalence of obesity has metabolic consequences such as diabetes and cardiovascular complications. Many existing therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) focus on lowering blood glucose; however, there is a major unmet need for treatments that both improve glycemic control and achieve metabolic benefits by weight loss. Lifestyle interventions, such as dieting and physical activity, typically provide only short-lasting weight loss in obese people, as weight loss maintenance is the greatest barrier to successful treatment of obesity [1].

 

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Topics: Treating Diabetes

Posted by Dr. Ulrike Hövelmann on Aug 28, 2018 5:11:00 PM
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Even moderate overweight increases the risk for cardiovascular disease, recent study says

A substantial amount of studies in the last decade have determined the detrimental effects of overweight and obesity on the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, cancer, and overall mortality. Nonetheless, there is also evidence in favour of the so-called “obesity-paradox” which states that overweight - or even obesity - exerts a protective role or has no impact on the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and overall mortality, because of increased cardiovascular mortality in the lowest BMI strata (J-curve).

In March 2018, a study was published by researchers from the University of Glasgow, challenging the obesity-paradox and heating up the debate of this much-discussed topic [1].

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Topics: Clinical Trials in Diabetes, Treating Diabetes, Clinical trials in Obesity

Posted by Dr. Daniela Lamers on Aug 7, 2018 5:09:00 PM
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Diabetes: A paradigm case for rewarding innovation in value-based healthcare

Chronic diseases in Europe account for 86% of deaths and 77% of disease burden, that impact on functional status and create a tremendous challenge on national economies. Ageing is a main driver of incident chronic diseases, which again trigger physical and mental vulnerability and morbidity. 

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Topics: Treating Diabetes

Posted by Dr. Lars Bochmann on Jul 11, 2018 5:12:00 PM
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Gut Microbiota and Type 2 Diabetes

For many years, microbes, e.g. bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms, have solely been associated with diseases and unhygienic conditions. In response, mankind has spared little effort to eradicate these organisms, be it in everyday life through ubiquitously available disinfectants or in a medical setting, e.g. through antibiotics or antifungal medication. While there are places where a germ-free environment is vital, e.g. an operation room, one needs to differentiate between spaces in which microorganisms physiologically should not exist (e.g. in our bloodstream) or spaces in which they should flourish (e.g. the colon).

Bearing this in mind, in recent years, researchers have found that the microorganisms living on and in our body (i.e. any surface connected to the outside world, e.g. skin, nasal and oral cavities, our gastrointestinal tract et cetera), our microbiota, are, in fact, not harmful to us. On the contrary, they may contribute to our health and well-being and protect us against actual pathogens (by forming a so-called “colonization resistance" [1]). In addition, research has revealed the complexity and diversity of our gut microbiota which may be in part responsible for the development of certain diseases including obesity and type 2 diabetes [2].

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Topics: Clinical Trials in Diabetes, Treating Diabetes, Diabetes Technology

Posted by Dr. Theresa Herbrand on Jul 4, 2018 5:16:00 PM
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CGM in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes

The CONCEPTT trial

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of preeclampsia, polyhydramnios and caesarean sections. Furthermore, for the infants of pregnant women with type 1 diabetes increased rates of congenital anomalies, premature deliveries, macrosomia, stillbirth and NICU admissions are reported. All these risks are known to increase with higher HbA1c values before or during pregnancy. Therefore the use of continuous monitoring in such patients might be advantageous, aiming for an optimal glucose control during pregnancy.  

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Topics: Clinical Trials in Diabetes, Treating Diabetes, Diabetes Technology

Posted by Dr. Grit Andersen on Jun 26, 2018 5:11:00 PM
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Smart ideas for noninvasive glucose monitoring

Last year I asked the question, Will noninvasive glucose monitoring end in tears? That article described the measurement of blood glucose without needles, without pain and without injury as the holy grail of glucose monitoring in diabetes. The hype that formed after Google’s announcement of their smart contact lens project raised huge expectations that a noninvasive solution was finally realistic and near. Since the initial project announcement in 2014, information on its progress has been scarce and a delay in clinical testing of the contact lens has fed speculations that the whole project will end in bitter disappointment. In this article, an update of the status of the smart contact lens project is given and new smart ideas for noninvasive glucose monitoring are discussed.

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Topics: Treating Diabetes, Diabetes Technology

Posted by Dr. Eric Zijlstra on Jun 13, 2018 4:53:00 PM
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