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Obesity treatment with lorcaserin

New data on metabolic & cardiovascular safety and efficacy

Worldwide, the incidence of obesity is increasing dramatically having almost tripled in the last 40 years [1]. In 2016, 39% of adults aged 18 years and older were overweight - 13% were obese. Because obesity is associated with an array of metabolic pathologies, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders, and even some cancers, identifying effective strategies for sustained weight loss are imperative.

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Topics: Clinical trials in Obesity

Posted by Dr. Daniela Lamers on Dec 11, 2018 5:21:00 PM
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Even moderate overweight increases the risk for cardiovascular disease, recent study says

A substantial amount of studies in the last decade have determined the detrimental effects of overweight and obesity on the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, cancer, and overall mortality. Nonetheless, there is also evidence in favour of the so-called “obesity-paradox” which states that overweight - or even obesity - exerts a protective role or has no impact on the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and overall mortality, because of increased cardiovascular mortality in the lowest BMI strata (J-curve).

In March 2018, a study was published by researchers from the University of Glasgow, challenging the obesity-paradox and heating up the debate of this much-discussed topic [1].

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Topics: Clinical trials in Obesity, Treating Diabetes, Clinical Trials in Diabetes

Posted by Dr. Daniela Lamers on Aug 7, 2018 5:09:00 PM
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SUSTAIN 7 - Semaglutide is superior to Dulaglutide

Glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are an established treatment option for type 2 diabetes. In addition to their blood glucose lowering effect (with a low risk of hypoglycaemia) they also promote weight loss. With the approval of liraglutide 3.0 mg/wk last year, a GLP-1R agonist is now also available for the treatment of obesity.

SUSTAIN 7 was an open-label, parallel-group, phase 3b trial at 194 sites in 16 countries investigating GLP-1R agonists semaglutide and dulaglutide [1]. Participants were 18 years and older and had type 2 diabetes with an HbA1c of 7.0-10.5% on metformin therapy (n=1201). Patients were assigned to either semaglutide 0.5 mg, dulaglutide 0.75 mg, semaglutide 1.0 mg or dulaglutide 1.5 mg. The study medication was injected once weekly for 40 weeks. Primary endpoint was change from baseline in HbA1c; the confirmatory secondary endpoint was change in bodyweight, both after 40 weeks of treatment. 


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Topics: Clinical Trials in Diabetes, Treating Diabetes, Clinical trials in Obesity

Posted by Dr. Daniela Lamers on Jun 5, 2018 5:09:00 PM
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Health claims & the need for scientific evidence in food studies

In December 2006 EU decision makers adopted Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 on the use of nutrition and health claims for foods. This Regulation lays down harmonised EU-wide rules for the use of health or nutritional claims on foodstuffs.

One of the key objectives of this Regulation is to ensure that any claim made on a food label in the EU is clear and substantiated by scientific evidence.

In the following, frequently asked questions about the Health Claims Regulation as well as its further implication for the conduct of evidence based food studies are provided.

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Topics: The Science behind Diabetes

Posted by Dr. Daniela Lamers on Dec 13, 2017 5:00:00 PM
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Alternate –Day Fasting: Any better than other Diets?

Is alternate-day fasting regimes the new trend?

Alternate-day fasting regimens have gained particular popularity in the last decade. The strategy of alternate-day fasting is to implement a fasting day, where individuals consume only 25% of their calories (approximately 500 kcal). The fasting day alternates with a “feast” day (every other day) where foods and liquids can be consumed ad libitum.

The idea behind is to eat the way our ancestors did – who had a life expectancy of 35 years without obesity and heart attacks – and the hope to lose weight with a diet which is said to be easier to stick to than traditional, everyday calorie restriction diets.

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Topics: Clinical trials in Obesity

Posted by Dr. Daniela Lamers on Sep 12, 2017 4:33:00 PM
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New Study about Sugar vs. Calorie-free Sweeteners

No influence of calorie-free drinks on total daily energy intake compared to sugar-sweetened drinks, recent study says

Worldwide, the incidence of obesity is increasing dramatically having more than doubled since 1980 [1]. Because obesity is associated with an array of metabolic pathologies, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders, and even some cancers, identifying strategies that help regulate body weight is imperative.

Substituting nutritive sweeteners by non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS), including artificial and natural NNS, may have potential in facilitating weight control [2-4]. By preserving palatability despite having fewer calories than sugar, NNS could help to lower the energy density of beverages and foods, resulting in a lower total energy intake. However, recurring arguments indicate that NNS increase the appetite for sweet foods, promote overeating, and may even lead to weight gain[5-7]. In light of that, numerous studies in the past two decades have been performed to address these issues, with the overall question remaining: Do NNS help to reduce body weight?

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Topics: Treating Diabetes, The Science behind Diabetes

Posted by Dr. Daniela Lamers on May 10, 2017 5:15:00 PM
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TECOS study: No CVD risk or heart failure with sitagliptin in high-risk diabetes patients

Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are promising anti-hyperglycemic agents, representing a major therapeutic advance for patients with type 2 diabetes as they do not induce hypoglycemia or weight gain and are generally well tolerated.

Sitagliptin is an orally administered DPP-4 inhibitor and first of its kind on the market (2006).  It prolongs the action of incretin hormones glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependant insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), by inhibiting their breakdown. Hereby it increases the secretion of insulin and supresses the release of glucagon, which helps to drive blood glucose values towards normal.

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Topics: Clinical Trials in Diabetes

Posted by Dr. Daniela Lamers on Sep 14, 2016 5:00:00 PM
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